Investigation into a fire that destroyed a wing of the NH Resort hotel

Investigators continue to try to determine what caused a fire that engulfed the south wing of North Conway’s Red Jacket Mountain Resort over the weekend. No one was seriously injured in the blaze on Saturday, but some guests escaped the flames by jumping from balconies. Fire officials said Monday they were waiting for adjusters to examine the wreckage. Fire Marshal Sean Toomey said he has a team of three to four investigators at the scene for 24 hours straight, and the next step is to interview witnesses and people who were staying at the hotel. “I would say it’s quite a complex scene due to the scale of the loss of the building,” Toomey said. The fire reduced the wing that housed 75 rooms to rubble. Videos posted by guests on social media revealed the rapid intensity of Saturday’s fire and sparked a debate about whether smoke alarms were sounding later,” Toomey said. “It was due to the damage caused by the number fires that were unfolding. ‘State law allows a hotel that is not a high-rise to not have a sprinkler system,’ he said. ‘While we advocate that the owners consider sprinkler systems part of capital programs and the like, it’s not a requirement under our state law.” Toomey said the fire started on the south side of south end of the building. He said that if it started on an outside balcony, the smoke and heat r would not be intense enough to set off a smoke detector in the bedroom. in our own homes that are wired with a working battery backup,” Toomey said. “These would only sound in the individual rooms.” He said investigators may never know the cause of the fire because much of the evidence has been destroyed.

Investigators continue to try to determine what caused a fire that engulfed the south wing of North Conway’s Red Jacket Mountain Resort over the weekend.

No one was seriously injured in the blaze on Saturday, but some guests escaped the flames by jumping from balconies.

Firefighters said Monday they were waiting for adjusters to examine the wreckage. Fire Marshal Sean Toomey said he has a team of three to four investigators at the scene for 24 hours straight, and the next step is to interview witnesses and people who were staying at the hotel.

“I would say it’s a pretty complex scene because of the scale of the building loss,” Toomey said.

The fire reduced the wing, which housed 75 rooms, to rubble. Videos posted by guests on social media revealed the rapid intensity of Saturday’s blaze and sparked debate over whether smoke alarms were sounding.

“North Conway Fire Chief (Pat) Preece said when he arrived he heard the alarms and they went away shortly thereafter,” Toomey said. “This was due to the damage caused by the amount of fires that were going on.”

Questions have also been raised about the lack of sprinkler systems in this part of the hotel, but Toomey said no sprinkler systems were needed in the building.

“Our statehood allows a hotel that is not high rise to not have a sprinkler system,” he said. “While we advocate that homeowners consider sprinkler systems part of capital and other programs, it is not a requirement under our state law.”

Toomey said the fire started on the south side of the south end of the building. He said if it started on an outdoor balcony, the smoke and heat wouldn’t be intense enough to set off a smoke detector in the bedroom.

“We know from tracking in the existing building that there were smoke detectors that we would find in our own homes that are wired with battery backup that worked,” Toomey said. “These would only sound in the individual rooms.”

He said investigators may never know the cause of the fire because much of the evidence has been destroyed.

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